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Quotes of the day: Ulysses S. Grant
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Published Sunday, April 27, 2014 @ 8:03 AM EDT
Apr 27 2014

Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant; April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th president of the United States (1869–1877) following his success as military commander in the American Civil War. Under Grant, the Union Army defeated the Confederate military; the war, and secession, ended with the surrender of Robert E. Lee's army at Appomattox Court House. As president, Grant led the Radical Republicans in their effort to eliminate vestiges of Confederate nationalism and slavery, protect African American citizenship, and defeat the Ku Klux Klan. In foreign policy, Grant sought to increase American trade and influence, while remaining at peace with the world. Although his Republican Party split in 1872 as reformers denounced him, Grant was easily reelected. During his second term the country's economy was devastated by the Panic of 1873, while investigations exposed corruption scandals in the administration. The conservative white Southerners regained control of Southern state governments and Democrats took control of the federal House of Representatives. By the time Grant left the White House in 1877, his Reconstruction policies were being undone. (Click here for full Wikipedia article)

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As the United States is the freest of all nations, so, too, its people sympathize with all people struggling for liberty and self- government; but while so sympathizing it is due to our honor that we should abstain from enforcing our views upon unwilling nations and from taking an interested part, without invitation,

But my later experience has taught me two lessons: first, that things are seen plainer after the events have occurred; second, that the most confident critics are generally those who know the least about the matter criticized.

God gave us Lincoln and Liberty, let us fight for both.

I believe that our Great Maker is preparing the world, in His own good time, to become one nation, speaking one language, and when armies and navies will be no longer required.

I don't underrate the value of military knowledge, but if men make war in slavish obedience to rules, they will fail.

I know no method to secure the repeal of bad or obnoxious laws so effective as their stringent execution.

I never wanted to get out of a place as much as I did to get out of the presidency.

I only know two tunes. One of them is Yankee Doodle and the other isn't.

I rise only to say that I do not intend to say anything. I thank you for your hearty welcomes and good cheers. (Grant's 'perfect speech')

In every battle there comes a time when both sides consider themselves beaten, then he who continues the attack wins.

It is men who wait to be selected, and not those who seek, from whom we may expect the most efficient service.

It is not with the religion of the self-styled Saints that we are now dealing, but with their practices. They will be protected in the worship of God according to the dictates of their consciences, but they will not be permitted to violate the laws under the cloak of religion. (re: Mormon polygamy)

It is preposterous to suppose that the people of one generation can lay down the best and only rules of government for all who are to come after them, and under unforeseen contingencies.

Labor disgraces no man; unfortunately you occasionally find men disgrace labor.

Leave the matter of religion to the family altar, the church, and the private school, supported entirely by private contributions. Keep the church and the State forever separate.

Nations, like individuals, are punished for their transgressions.

The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike him as hard as you can, and keep moving on.

The distant rear of an army engaged in battle is not the best place from which to judge correctly what is going on in front.

The friend in my adversity I shall always cherish most. I can better trust those who helped to relieve the gloom of my dark hours than those who are so ready to enjoy with me the sunshine of my prosperity.

The will of the people is the best law.

Though I have been trained as a soldier, and participated in many battles, there never was a time when, in my opinion, some way could not be found to prevent the drawing of the sword.

Two commanders on the same field are always one too many.

Wars produce many stories of fiction, some of which are told until they are believed to be true.


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