« Hannah Arendt
Home Page
Harold Ramis »

Quotes of the day: Harold Pinter
(permalink)

Published Thursday, October 09, 2014 @ 9:41 PM EDT
Oct 09 2014

Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (October 10, 1930 - December 24, 2008) was a Nobel Prize-winning English playwright, screenwriter, director and actor. One of the most influential modern British dramatists, his writing career spanned more than 50 years. His best- known plays include The Birthday Party (1957), The Homecoming (1964), and Betrayal (1978), each of which he adapted for the screen. His screenplay adaptations of others' works include The Servant (1963), The Go-Between (1970), The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981), The Trial (1993), and Sleuth (2007). He also directed or acted in radio, stage, television, and film productions of his own and others' works. (Click here for full Wikipedia article)

-----

All that happens is that the destruction of human beings- unless they're Americans- is called collateral damage.

Apart from the known and the unknown, what else is there?

How can the unknown merit reverence?

I know little of women. But I've heard dread tales.

I ought not to speak about the dead because the dead are all over the place.

I sometimes feel that the past is never past.

I think it is the responsibility of a citizen of any country to say what he thinks.

If you have only one of something you can't say it's the best of anything.

It was difficult being a conscientious objector in the 1940s, but I felt I had to stick to my guns.

It's so easy for propaganda to work, and dissent to be mocked.

It's very difficult to feel contempt for others when you see yourself in the mirror.

Language in art remains a highly ambiguous transaction, a quicksand, a trampoline, a frozen pool which might give way under you... at any time.

Most of the press is in league with government, or with the status quo.

Nothing is more sterile or lamentable than the man content to live within himself.

One way of looking at speech is to say it is a constant stratagem to cover nakedness.

One's life has many compartments.

Our beginnings never know our ends.

Tell me more about the quaint little perversions of your life and times.

The past is what you remember, imagine you remember, convince yourself you remember, or pretend you remember.

There are no hard distinctions between what is real and what is unreal, nor between what is true and what is false. A thing is not necessarily either true or false; it can be both true and false.

There are some things one remembers even though they may never have happened.

We admit possibility only after we grant necessity.

You don't have to believe anything.

You don't know what your trouble is, my friend. That's your trouble.


Categories: Harold Pinter, Quotes of the day


Feedburner RSS Subscribe  Email Subscribe  Home   Commentwear   E-Mail KGB


Donate via PayPal


Older entries, Archives and Categories       Top of page


Like KGB Report on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

« Hannah Arendt
Home Page
Harold Ramis »