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Atari, PTSD, healthcare, dangers from wallpaper, cladding, ticks, Roundup, eventual asteroid destruction
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Published Tuesday, June 27, 2017 @ 12:08 AM EDT
Jun 27 2017

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Today is Tuesday, June 27, the 178th day of 2017 in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. This is the 159th day of Donald Trump's presidency. There are 1,303 days remaining in his term, assuming he doesn't resign or is otherwise removed from office.

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The New York Times' On This Day for today.

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On this day in 1972, the video game company Atari was founded by Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dabney. Atari was a pioneer in arcade games, home video game consoles, and home computers. The company's products, such as Pong and the Atari 2600, helped define the electronic entertainment industry from the 1970s to the mid-1980s.

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Among other things, today is also National PTSD Awareness Day.

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Man Arrested After Pilotless Boat Crashes Onto Florida Beach.

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Quote of the day:

"Keep your face to the sunshine and you cannot see the shadows."
-Helen Keller (June 27, 1880 - June 1, 1968)
(More Helen Keller quotes)

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Big stories:
Senate health bill gets a wary reception, from coast to coast;
Senate GOP health-care bill appears in deeper trouble following new CBO report; Britain to test schools and hospitals after 75 out of 75 high-rise buildings fail fire safety tests.

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Your credit score may get a bump next month. About 12 million people will get a lift in their credit scores next month as the national credit reporting agencies wipe from their records two major sources of negative information about borrowers: tax liens and civil judgments.

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New study of Seattle's $15 minimum wage says it costs jobs. Critics say the study's "synthetic" Seattle model draws only from areas in Washington that are nothing like Seattle, and the report excludes multisite businesses, which employ a large percentage of Seattle's low-paid workforce. The latter fact was also problematic, he said, because that meant workers who left single-site businesses to work at multisite businesses were counted as job losses, not job gains in the UW study. (Seattle Times)

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"Pharma Bro" Shkreli jury picking goes very slow: 'I think he's a very evil man,' one woman says. Jury selection in the securities fraud trial of Martin Shkreli got off to a slow start Monday as multiple potential jurors expressed disdain for the notorious pharma bro, who gained infamy in 2015 by raising a drug price by more than 5,000 percent.

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The most devastating passage in the CBO's report on the Senate health bill... The CBO says "few low-income people would purchase any plan" under GOP health bill. (Vox)

As lawmakers debate GOP healthcare bill, new study finds stripping people of insurance can be deadly. The number of Americans who die prematurely would rise by about 29,000 each year if the health reform plan put forth by Senate Republicans were to go into full effect, a new report suggests. (Los Angeles Times)

Here's what happens to breast cancer diagnoses when Medicaid is rolled back. "Medicaid rollbacks may limit access to preventive and primary care that facilitates early diagnosis for low-income patients, which could lead to higher health care costs and poorer health outcomes over time. (Huffington Post)

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Will social media kill the novel? Writers thrive on privacy, not on Twitter. What does a world in which our interior lives are played out online mean for the novel? (The Guardian)

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Why big business keeps winning at the Supreme Court. The rest of us will lose out to corporate power without populist justices. (Washington Post)

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Your environment is out to kill you. Airborne fungal toxins from wallpaper pose serious health risk to homeowners (Tech Times).

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Why you should really be scared of ticks this summer. (New York Post)

Menacing tick that causes humans to develop a severe allergy to meat observed in Pennsylvania. (Philly Voice)

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California to list glyphosate (Roundup) as cancer-causing; Monsanto vows fight.

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How Carlin's seven dirty words fostered an open Internet 20 years ago. The Supreme Court ruled that the same censorship standards being applied to broadcast radio and television could not be applied to the Internet. (Ars Technica)

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Impact threat from asteroid Apophis cannot be ruled out. "We can rule out a collision at the next closest approach with the Earth (2029), but then the orbit will change in a way that is not fully predictable just now, so we cannot predict the behavior on a longer timescale." (phys.org)

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Google will no longer scan Gmail for ad targeting. As it builds its Google Cloud business for selling internet infrastructure and services to corporate customers, Google is trying to ease concerns that it will use data from corporate customers to help its mainstay advertising business.

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Greenland now a major driver of rising seas: study. Ocean levels rose 50 percent faster in 2014 than in 1993, with meltwater from the Greenland ice sheet now supplying 25 percent of total sea level increase compared with just five percent 20 years earlier, researchers reported Monday. (phys.org)

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Why total solar eclipses are total coincidences. "The (diameter of the) moon is almost exactly 400 (times) smaller than the sun's diameter, and the sun is almost exact 400 times further away than the moon," said Mark Gallaway, an astronomer at the University of Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom. "The consequence of this is that the angular diameter, or the size we see, of the sun and the moon in the sky are almost exactly the same." (LiveScience)

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Remember Star Trek's Eugenics War? Humans reach for godhood- and leave their humanity behind.

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John Oliver begs parents to listen to science (rather than Rob Schneider) on vaccines. (AV Club)

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Liberal arts in the data age... From Silicon Valley to the Pentagon, people are beginning to realize that to effectively tackle today's biggest social and technological challenges, we need to think critically about their human context—something humanities graduates happen to be well trained to do. Call it the revenge of the film, history, and philosophy nerds. (Harvard Business Review)

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How lack of sleep affects the brain. (BBC News)

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Watch a seven-day Mystery Science Theater 3000 marathon right here. (Games Radar)

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Anonymous says NASA is about to announce evidence of alien life... (Science Alert) but Anonymous doesn't have any evidence to back up their speculation. (Popular Science)

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Amazon robots poised to revamp how Whole Foods runs warehouses. The retailer could bring its distribution technology to the grocery chain. (Bloomberg)

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'Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly' slips to new low in week four. Beaten again by reruns of 60 Minutes and America's Funniest Home Videos. (Variety)

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Trump Dump:
(As of midnight...)

Trump's "victory" on travel ban is far from "clear". The Supreme Court's partial stay raises some issues. (axios.com)

Trump likely to break many of his health-care promises- no matter what happens. (Washington Post).

Image of the United States has plunged under Trump, survey shows. Five months into Trump's presidency, the survey spanning 37 nations showed U.S. favorability ratings in the rest of the world slumping to 49 percent from 64 percent at the end of Barack Obama's eight years in the White House. (Reuters).

The National Enquirer's fervor for Trump... The tabloid is defined by its predatory spirit. Why has it embraced the President with such sycophantic zeal? (The New Yorker)

Trump won, and Amy Siskind started a list of changes. Now it's a sensation. Yeah, but it's no KGB Trump Dump... (Washington Post)

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« Bar codes, chocolate pudding day, gator attack, Amazon drone beehive, perturbing the Kuiper Belt
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