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Quotes of the day
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Published Sunday, June 24, 2012 @ 6:41 AM EDT
Jun 24 2012

Quotes of the day- Henry Ward Beecher:
 
Henry Ward Beecher (June 24, 1813 – March 8, 1887) was a prominent Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, abolitionist, and speaker in the mid to late 19th century. An 1875 adultery trial in which he was accused of having an affair with a married woman was one of the most notorious American trials of the 19th century. (Click here for the full Wikipedia article)

A law is valuable not because it is law, but because there is right in it.

A library is not a luxury but one of the necessities of life.

A person without a sense of humor is like a wagon without springs. It's jolted by every pebble on the road.

Adversity, if for no other reason, is of benefit, since it is sure to bring a season of sober reflection. People see clearer at such times. Storms purify the atmosphere.

All men are tempted. There is no man that lives that can't be broken down, provided it is the right temptation, put in the right spot.

Books are not made for furniture, but there is nothing else that so beautifully furnishes a house.

Compassion will cure more sins than condemnation.

Doctrine is nothing but the skin of truth set up and stuffed.

Every writer dips his brush into his own soul, and paints his own nature into his pictures.

Greatness lies not in being strong, but in the right use of strength.

Hold yourself responsible for a higher standard than anybody expects of you. Never excuse yourself. Never pity yourself. Be a hard master to yourself- and be lenient to everybody else.

“I can forgive, but I cannot forget” is only another way of saying, “I cannot forgive.” Forgiveness ought to be like a cancelled note- torn in two, and burned up, so that it never can be shown against one.

In this world, full often, our joys are only the tender shadows which our sorrows cast.

It's easier to go down a hill than up it but the view is much better at the top.

Men's best successes come after their disappointments.

Never forget what a man says to you when he is angry.

No man is more cheated than the selfish man.

No man is sane who does not know how to be insane on the proper occasions.

Riches without law are more dangerous than poverty without law.

Success is full of promise till men get it; and then it is last year's nest from which the bird has flown.

The ability to convert ideas to things is the secret to outward success.

The art of being happy lies in the power of extracting happiness from common things.

The blossom cannot tell what becomes of its odor; and no man can tell what becomes of his influence.

The cynic is one who never sees a good quality in a man, and never fails to see a bad one. He is the human owl, vigilant in darkness and blind to light, mousing for vermin, and never seeing noble game.

The difference between perseverance and obstinacy is, that one often comes from a strong will, and the other from a strong won't.

The dog was created specially for children. He is the god of frolic.

The indolent mind is not empty, but full of vermin.

The worst thing in the world, next to anarchy, is government.

There are many persons of combative tendencies, who read for ammunition, and dig out of the Bible iron for balls. They read, and they find nitre and charcoal and sulphur for powder. They read, and they find cannon. They read, and they make portholes and embrasures. And if a man does not believe as they do, they look upon him as an enemy, and let fly the Bible at him to demolish him. So men turn the word of God into a vast arsenal, filled with all manner of weapons, offensive and defensive.

There are more quarrels smothered by just shutting your mouth, and holding it shut, than by all the wisdom in the world.

There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children. One of these is roots... the other, wings.

There is but one easy place in this world, and that is the grave.

There is nothing that makes more cowards and feeble men than public opinion.

We should not judge people by their peak of excellence; but by the distance they have traveled from the point where they started.

Whatever is only almost true is quite false, and among the most dangerous of errors, because being so near truth, it is the more likely to lead astray.

When a nation's young men are conservative, its funeral bell is already rung.

Where is human nature so weak as in the bookstore?


Categories: Henry Ward Beecher, Quotes of the day


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