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Cronkite, Greenspan, 26,000 stink bugs, outsourcing everything, fat is back
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Published Monday, March 05, 2018 @ 9:22 PM EST
Mar 05 2018

Note: KGB Report is published the evening before the issue date. For ongoing posts throughout the day, follow KGB Report or my personal page on Facebook.

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This is the KGB Report for Tuesday, March 6, the 65th day of 2018 in the Gregorian calendar, with 300 days remaining.

This is the 410th day of Donald Trump's presidency, of which he has spent 95 days at golf courses at a cost to taxpayers of $56,067,248. There are 1,051 days remaining in his term, assuming he doesn't resign, is otherwise removed from office, or his unhinged, psychotic behavior results in the destruction of the republic.

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On this date in 1981, Walter Cronkite signed off as anchorman of The CBS Evening News. During the heyday of CBS News in the 1960s and 1970s, he was often cited as "the most trusted man in America" after being so named in an opinion poll. In his career he reported many events from 1937 to 1981, including bombings in World War II; the Nuremberg trials; combat in the Vietnam War; the Dawson's Field hijackings; Watergate; the Iran Hostage Crisis; and the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy, civil rights pioneer Martin Luther King Jr., and Beatles musician John Lennon. He was also known for his extensive coverage of the US space program, from Project Mercury to the Moon landings to the Space Shuttle. He was the only non-NASA recipient of an Ambassador of Exploration award. Cronkite was well known for his departing catchphrase "And that's the way it is," followed by the broadcast's date. (Full Wikipedia article)

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On this date: in 1820, the Missouri Compromise was signed into law by President James Monroe, which allowed Missouri to enter the Union as a slave state, brought Maine into the Union as a free state, and made the rest of the northern part of the Louisiana Purchase territory slavery-free; in 1831, Edgar Allan Poe flunked out of the United States Military Academy (West Point); in 1836, after a thirteen-day siege by an army of 3,000 Mexican troops, 187 Texas volunteers defending the Alamo, including frontiersman Davy Crockett and Colonel Jim Bowie, were killed and the fort was captured; in 1853, Giuseppe Verdi's opera "La Traviata" premiered in Venice; in 1857, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in the Dred Scott v. Sandford case that persons of African descent were not American citizens; in 1869, Dmitri Mendeleev presented the first periodic table to the Russian Chemical Society; in 1886, the first US alternating current power plant opened in Great Barrington, Massachusetts; in 1930, shoppers in Springfield, MA became the first Americans to find frozen food in their grocery stores; in 1943, Norman Rockwell published "Freedom from Want" in The Saturday Evening Post with a matching essay by Carlos Bulosan as part of the Four Freedoms series; in 1945, George Nissen of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, received a patent for the first modern trampoline; in 1950 Silly Putty was introduced in the US; in 1951, the trial of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg began; in 1964, Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad officially gave boxing champion Cassius Clay the name Muhammad Ali; in 1966, Barry Sadler's "Ballad of the Green Berets" reached #1 on the charts, where it stayed for 13 weeks; in 1967, Joseph Stalin's daughter Svetlana Alliluyeva defects to the United States; in 1970, the Beatles released "Let it Be" in UK; in 1970, an explosion at a Weather Underground safe house in Greenwich Village killed three; in 1975, on the ABC late-night television show Good Night America (hosted by Geraldo Rivera), JFK assassination researchers Robert Groden and Dick Gregory presented the first-ever network television showing of the Zapruder home movie; in 1978, serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin shot Hustler magazine publisher Larry Flynt, paralyzing him from the waist down; in 1983, the first United States Football League games were played; in 1991, following Iraq's capitulation in the Persian Gulf conflict, US President George H.W. Bush told Congress that "aggression is defeated. The war is over"; in 1992, the Michelangelo computer virus began to affect computers; in 2017, US President Donald Trump signed his second executive order barring travelers from six mostly Muslim countries for 90 days, but leaves out Iraq.

More of what happened on February 27 from On This Day and Wikipedia.

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Among other things, today is Alamo Day, Dentist's Day, National Frozen Food Day, National Oreo Cookie Day, Peace Corp Day, National Sportsmanship Day, National White Chocolate Cheesecake Day, and Unique Names Day (from Checkiday.com)

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Florida woman suing T-Mobile store employee who stole sex video from phone

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Alan Greenspan (b. March 6, 1926) is an American economist who served as Chairman of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006. He currently works as a private adviser and provides consulting for firms through his company, Greenspan Associates LLC. First appointed Federal Reserve chairman by President Ronald Reagan in August 1987, he was reappointed at successive four-year intervals until retiring on January 31, 2006, after the second-longest tenure in the position (behind William McChesney Martin). (Full Wikipedia article.)

Quote of the day:

"If I seem unduly clear to you, you must have misunderstood what I said."
-Alan Greenspan (Click here for more quotes.)

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Escort says audio recordings show Russian meddling in US election. A Belarusian escort with close ties to a powerful Russian oligarch said from behind bars in Bangkok on Monday that she had more than 16 hours of audio recordings that could help shed light on Russian meddling in United States elections. Her assertion could be easy to disregard were it not for a 25-minute video investigation posted last month on YouTube by the Russian opposition figure Aleksei A. Navalny, which relies heavily on videos and photographs from Ms. Vashukevich. It's not the pee pee tape, but what the hey...

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Amazon may soon offer checking accounts. Eventually all your discretionary income will go to Amazon anyway. May as well cut out the middle man.

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Asteroid mining will happen sooner than you think. There's an actual plan with actual economics already in place awaiting the full development of NASA's SLS rocket technology.

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When 26,000 stinkbugs invade your home. More than you could possibly want to know about stinkbugs, but fascinating and well-written, nonetheless. For example, "...the smell of the brown marmorated stinkbug is often likened to that of cilantro, chiefly because the same chemical is present in both. In reality, stinkbugs smell like cilantro only in the way that rancid cilantro-mutton stew smells like cilantro, which is to say, they do not."

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911 recordings reveal Apple's problem of employees walking into walls. The building makes extensive use of massive, floor-to-ceiling glass panels, giving the illusion that the building blends seamlessly into the surrounding forest. But when Apple started letting employees use it in January, they discovered a big problem: they kept running into glass windows and doors.

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Bizarre alien-like plant that lives underground and eats mushrooms spotted for first time in 150 years. This flower has no leaves, rarely blooms, lives underground for most of the year and eats mushrooms.

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Scientist says he's found fossilized alien footprints on Mars, blames NASA for cover-up.

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Mueller is casting a wide net. We now know the target is Trump. Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III is now directly gunning for President Trump — and not just on one front. It appears that Mueller is investigating whether Trump himself committed misconduct or possible criminality on two fronts, and possibly more.

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Hope for American politicians: Scientists fix the gene that causes intellectual disability in men.

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Medicine's long, thin supply chain. By offshoring its drug and medical supply manufacturing, the US has put patients and hospitals in a frighteningly precarious position. This ought to be a matter of national security. So far, it's not.

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Fat is back and premium butter makers are taking the cream. Consumers aren't just eating more butter, they are willing to pay more for it, a boon that's giving outsize gains to makers of premium brands.

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Here's the deal on inclusion riders. It's when stars throw their weight around: a provision added to actors' contracts to ensure that casting on productions is more representative. "It stipulates that in small and supporting roles, characters should reflect the world we live in." That includes 50 percent gender parity, 40 percent inclusion for people of color, 5 percent L.G.B.T.Q., and 20 percent disabled.

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Is a standing desk actually bad for your health? "The bottom line is that this expansion (in the use of such desks) has been driven more by commercial reasons than scientific evidence."

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