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Quotes of the day: Fyodor Dostoyevsky
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Published Monday, November 11, 2013 @ 5:32 AM EST
Nov 11 2013

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky (November 11, 1821 - February 9, 1881), sometimes transliterated Dostoevsky, was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist and philosopher. Dostoyevsky's literary works explore human psychology in the context of the troubled political, social, and spiritual atmosphere of 19th-century Russia. He began writing in his 20s, and his first novel, Poor Folk, was published in 1846 when he was 25. His major works include Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1869), and The Brothers Karamazov (1880). His output consists of eleven novels, three novellas, seventeen short novels and numerous other works. Many literary critics rate him as one of the greatest and most prominent psychologists in world literature. (Click here for full Wikipedia article)

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A just cause is not ruined by a few mistakes.

A fool with a heart and no sense is just as unhappy as a fool with sense and no heart.

A man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point where he does not discern any truth either in himself or anywhere around him, and thus falls into disrespect towards himself and others.

A man who lies to himself is often the first to take offense.

Civilization has made man, if not always more bloodthirsty, at least more viciously, more horribly bloodthirsty.

I believe the best definition of man is the ungrateful biped.

I think the devil doesn't exist, but man has created him, he has created him in his own image and likeness.

If you want to be respected by others the great thing is to respect yourself.

Inventors and geniuses have almost always been looked on as no better than fools at the beginning of their career, and very frequently at the end of it also.

Love in action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared with love in dreams.

Lying is only man's privilege over all other organisms.

Lying to ourselves is more deeply ingrained than lying to others.

Man is unhappy because he doesn't know he's happy. It's only that.

Men reject their prophets and slay them, but they love their martyrs and honor those they have slain.

Nothing in this world is harder than speaking the truth, nothing easier than flattery.

Pain and suffering are always inevitable for a large intelligence and a deep heart. The really great men must, I think, have great sadness on Earth.

Sarcasm: the last refuge of modest and chaste-souled people when the privacy of their soul is coarsely and intrusively invaded.

Taking a new step, uttering a new word, is what people fear most.

The more I love humanity in general, the less I love man in particular.

The second half of a man's life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half.

What terrible tragedies realism inflicts on people.

There are things which a man is afraid to tell even to himself, and every decent man has a number of such things stored away in his mind.

Power is given only to those who dare to lower themselves and pick it up.

Man only likes to count his troubles, but he does not count his joys.

There is no subject so old that something new cannot be said about it.


Categories: Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Quotes of the day


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