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Seven score and nine years ago...
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Published Monday, November 19, 2012 @ 8:38 AM EST
Nov 19 2012

...on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered the "Gettysburg Address" at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery.

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Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

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It wasn't by accident that the Gettysburg address was so short. The laws of prose writing are as immutable as those of flight, of mathematics, of physics.
-Ernest Hemingway


Categories: Abraham Lincoln, Ernest Hemingway, History


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Quotes of the day
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Published Saturday, July 21, 2012 @ 6:52 AM EDT
Jul 21 2012

Quotes of the day- Ernest Hemingway:
 
Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story collections and two non-fiction works. Three novels, four collections of short stories and three non-fiction works were published posthumously. Many of these are considered classics of American literature. (Click here for full article.)

A big lie is more plausible than truth.

A man's got to take a lot of punishment to write a really funny book.

All good books have one thing in common- they are truer than if they had really happened.

All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn... American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.

All politics is a matter of working hard without reward, or with a living wage for a time, in the hope of booty later.

All things truly wicked start from an innocence.

All thinking men are atheists.

Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut.

America is the land of wide lawns and narrow minds.

An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his friends.

And how much better to die in all the happy period of undisillusioned youth, to go out in a blaze of light, than to have your body worn out and old and illusions shattered.

But man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.

Every day above earth is a good day

Everybody is friends when things are bad enough.

Fear of death increases in exact proportion to increase in wealth.

Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know.

However you make your living is where your talent lies.

I [like to write letters] because it's such a swell way to keep from working and yet feel you've done something.

I know only that what is moral is what you feel good after and what is immoral is what you feel bad after.

I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I'm awake, you know?

I've been in love (truly) with five women, the Spanish Republic and the 4th Infantry Division.

If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.

It wasn't by accident that the Gettysburg address was so short. The laws of prose writing are as immutable as those of flight, of mathematics, of physics.

Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.

My attitude toward punctuation is that it ought to be as conventional as possible. The game of golf would lose a good deal if croquet mallets and billiard cues were allowed on the putting green. You ought to be able to show that you can do it a good deal better than anyone else with the regular tools before you have a license to bring in your own improvements.

Never confuse movement with action.

Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime. Ask the infantry and ask the dead.

Nobody knows what's in him until he tries to pull it out. If there's nothing, or very little, the shock can kill a man.

One cat just leads to another.

Prose is architecture, not interior decoration, and the Baroque is over.

That is the great fallacy; the wisdom of old men. They do not grow wise. They grow careful.

The good parts of a book may be only something a writer is lucky enough to overhear or it may be the wreck of his whole damn life- and one is as good as the other.

The most essential gift for a good writer is a built-in, shock-proof, shit detector. This is the writer's radar and all great writers have had it.

The sole purpose of the cabaret is for unattached men to find complaisant women. All the rest is a wasting of time in bad air.

The world breaks everyone, and afterward many are strong at the broken places.

There is honor among pickpockets and honor among whores. It is simply that the standards differ.

There is no lonelier man in death, except the suicide, than that man who has lived many years with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it.

There is no such thing as safety. There are so many seeking safety here now that they make a great danger. In seeking safety now you lose all.

They say the seeds of what we will do are in all of us, but it always seemed to me that in those who make jokes in life the seeds are covered with better soil and with a higher grade of manure.

They wrote in the old days that it is sweet and fitting to die for ones country. But in modern war there is nothing sweet nor fitting in your dying. You will die like a dog for no good reason.

To be a successful father there's one absolute rule: when you have a kid, don't look at it for the first two years.

Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today.

War is no longer made by simply analysed economic forces if it ever was. War is made or planned now by individual men, demagogues and dictators who play on the patriotism of their people to mislead them into a belief in the great fallacy of war when all their vaunted reforms have failed to satisfy the people they misrule.

Wars are Spinach. Life in general is the tough part. In war all you have to do is not worry and know how to read a map and co-ordinates.

We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master.

When some people hear an echo, they think they originated the sound.

When you give power to an executive you do not know who will be filling that position when the time of crisis comes.

When you stop doing things for fun you might as well be dead.

You never understand anybody that loves you.


Categories: Ernest Hemingway, Quotes of the day


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