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Quotes of the day - Daniel Defoe
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Published Sunday, April 24, 2016 @ 8:22 PM EDT
Apr 24 2016

Daniel Defoe (c. 1660 – April 24, 1731), born Daniel Foe, was an English trader, writer, journalist, pamphleteer, and spy, most famous for his novel Robinson Crusoe. Defoe is noted for being one of the earliest proponents of the novel, as he helped to popularise the form in Britain with others such as Samuel Richardson, and is among the founders of the English novel. He was a prolific and versatile writer, producing more than five hundred books, pamphlets, and journals on various topics, including politics, crime, religion, marriage, psychology, and the supernatural. He was also a pioneer of economic journalism. (Click here for full Wikipedia article)

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All men would be tyrants if they could.

All our discontents about what we want appeared to spring from the want of thankfulness for what we have.

As covetousness is the root of all evil, so poverty is the worst of all snares.

It is better to have a lion at the head of an army of sheep, than a sheep at the head of an army of lions.

Justice is always violent to the party offending, for every man is innocent in his own eyes.

Necessity makes an honest man a knave.

The best of men cannot suspend their fate:
The good die early, and the bad die late.

The soul is placed in the body like a rough diamond, and must be polished, or the luster of it will never appear.

'Tis no sin to cheat the devil.

'Tis very strange Men should be so fond of being thought wickeder than they are.

Vice came in always at the door of necessity, not at the door of inclination.

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(April 24 is also the birthday of Anthony Trollope and Robert Penn Warren.)


Categories: Daniel Defoe, Quotes of the day


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