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Quotes of the day
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Published Sunday, February 12, 2012 @ 12:01 AM EST
Feb 12 2012

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 - April 15, 1865):

Allow the president to invade a neighboring nation, whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion, and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such a purpose-and you allow him to make war at pleasure.

Any people anywhere being inclined and having the power have the right to rise up and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better.

As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy.

Determine that the thing can and shall be done, and then we shall find the way.

Discourage litigation. Persuade your neighbors to compromise whenever you can. Point out to them how the nominal winner is often a real loser— in fees, expenses, and waste of time.

Even though much provoked, let us do nothing through passion and ill temper.

Human action can be modified to some extent, but human nature cannot be changed.

I am rather inclined to silence, and whether that be wise or not, it is at least more unusual nowadays to find a man who can hold his tongue than to find one who cannot.

I believe it is an established maxim in morals that he who makes an assertion without knowing whether it is true or false, is guilty of falsehood; and the accidental truth of the assertion, does not justify or excuse him.

I do not like that man. I must get to know him better.

I must stand with anybody that stands right, stand with him while he is right, and part with him when he goes wrong.

I shall try to correct errors when shown to be errors; and I shall adopt new views so fast as they shall appear to be true views.

It has been my experience that folks who have no vices have very few virtues.

Let us discard all this quibbling about this man and the other man, this race and that race and the other race being inferior and therefore they must be placed in an inferior position. Let us discard all these things, and unite as one people throughout this land, until we shall once more stand up declaring that all men are created equal.

Men are not flattered by being shown that there has been a difference of purpose between the Almighty and them.

No man is good enough to govern another man without that other's consent.

The better part of one's life consists of his friendships.

The dogmas of the quiet past, are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew.

The probability that we may fail in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just.

The severest justice may not always be the best policy.

The true rule, in determining to embrace, or reject any thing, is not whether it have any evil in it; but whether it have more of evil, than of good.

These capitalists generally act harmoniously and in concert to fleece the people, and now that they have got into a quarrel with themselves, we are called upon to appropriate the people's money to settle the quarrel.

This country, with its institutions, belongs to the people who inhabit it. Whenever they shall grow weary of the existing Government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it or their revolutionary right to dismember or overthrow it.

Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves; and, under a just God, can not long retain it.

Truth is generally the best vindication against slander.

We all declare for liberty; but in using the same word we do not all mean the same thing.

We live in the midst of alarms; anxiety beclouds the future; we expect some new disaster with each newspaper we read.

When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.

When you have an elephant by the hind legs and he is trying to run away, it's best to let him run.

Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.

With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed. Consequently he who moulds public sentiment, goes deeper than he who enacts statutes or pronounces decisions.


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